Russia delivers oil to North Korea in defiance of UN sanctions – OilPrice.com

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Russia delivers oil to North Korea in defiance of UN sanctions – OilPrice.com

Russia has supplied oil directly to North Korea this year, with both regimes openly defying UN sanctions over oil sales to Pyongyang in response to its nuclear weapons tests, satellite images shared exclusively showed with the Financial Times.

North Korea has been under UN Security Council sanctions since 2017, but Russia has since reportedly supplied and smuggled oil into the country.


In August 2018, the Asian Institute for Policy Studies said that although most oil trade with North Korea, circumventing sanctions, would come from China, Russia’s oil sales to the Kim Jong- A could be much larger than official figures suggest. because front companies were created to manage illicit oil flows to Pyongyang.

With an alleged oil-for-arms deal with North Korea, Russia appears to have increased its oil deliveries to Kim Jong-Un in exchange for munitions and other military equipment from North Korea to use in its war in Ukraine .


Today, satellite images, which British think tank Royal United Services Institute shared with FT, showed that in March alone, at least five North Korean tankers traveled to load petroleum products from the port of Vostochny, the largest port in the Russian Far East. East.




These deliveries are the first documented direct maritime shipments of oil from Russia to North Korea since the imposition of UN sanctions in 2017, notes the FT.

“These oil shipments constitute a frontal attack on the sanctions regime, which is now on the brink of collapse,” Hugh Griffiths, former coordinator of the UN panel monitoring sanctions, told the British newspaper. against North Korea.

The Russian and North Korean regimes have grown closer in recent years and exchanged supplies to help each other.


Last month, South Korean Defense Minister Shin Won-sik said some North Korean factories were working full time to produce weapons for Russia in exchange for food and other supplies.

“While North Korean arms factories are operating at 30 percent capacity due to shortages of raw materials and electricity, some factories are operating at full capacity, mainly producing weapons and shells for Russia,” he said. Shin said in late February, reported by Sud. Korean Yonhap News Agency.

By Tsvetana Paraskova for Oilprice.com

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